82 HULL—HOUSE MAPS AND PAPERS. 
it the yearly income, gives $236.25 as the average 
yearly income of girls in the cloak trade. 
The following table gives weekly wage, yearly income, 
and weekly income, based on the two hundred and fifty 
wage record-books already referred to : — 
CLOAKMAKF.RS IN CHICAGO. 
YEARLY 
INCOME. 
WEEKLY 
WAGE. 
WEEKLY 
INCOME. 
Machine Work 
$430.00 
$12.28 
$8.27 
Hand-workers on Cloaks 
325.00 
9.29 
6.25 
Girls employed as finishers .. 
236.25 
6.75 
4.54 
Average rec'd by those engaged in 
the trade 
330.42 
9.44 
6.35 
This may properly be followed by a table of compu- 
tations comparing the yearly income of cloakmakers 
in Chicago (family men and single men being given to- 
gether, as they get practically the same wages in this 
city) with the yearly expenditure of family men and of 
single men separately : — 
Yearly income of cloakmakers in Chicago (family 
men and single men) $330 42 
Yearly expenditure of cloakmakers (family men) . 440.04 
Yearly expenditure of cloakmakers (single men) . . 255.44 
This table represents current rates paid before the 
panic of 1893 ; but during the extreme depression of 
trade following this panic, the pay of garment workers 
in nearly every branch of the trade, and in the cloak- 
making trade among others, was cut down about one- 
half. This statement is supported by the following 
definite enumeration of prices paid to workmen before 
and after the panic. A plush cloak for which the tailor 
received $1.25 before the crisis, in August, 1894, brought