96 HULL—HOUSE MAPS AND PAPERS. 

OVER 
21 YEARS. 
BETWEEN 
4 AND 21. 
uNDER .„. 4 

 
DEATH RATE. 

TINDER 




GENERAL. 
, YEARS. 
Ward VII. 
600 
300 
100 
14.18 
7.88 
Ward XVI. 
550 
310 
140 
19.46 
12.24 
Ward XIX. 
600 
310 
90 
17.13 
8.91 
Whether it is due to his religious observances or his 
exclusiveness, the vitality of the Jew is incontestable. 
A closer study of the institutions and habits of this 
community may give us a standard of judgment, a de- 
sideratum not only that we may do justice to the Jew 
in these latter days of anti-Semitism, but also because of 
the magnitude of the problem forced on the city and 
the country in the necessity of absorbing these foreign 
elements. Both by the persistence of their traits when 
segregated, and the readiness with which they assimilate 
when encouraged, the Jews furnish the most instructive 
element in our population. We shall find that although 
the Jew would be characterized by many Americans 
in the Shakespearian utterance, " God made him, let 
him pass for a man," the open sesame for the inhabit- 
ant of the Ghetto is, " God made him, let him pass 
for a man." Opportunity is what the foreigner in our 
cities needs. 
So much has been written lately on the general fea- 
tures of Jewish life in crowded city quarters, that the 
reader's familiarity with these facts may be presupposed.' 
1 Gregorovius, "Der Ghetto and die Juden in Rom" (Wander- 
jahre, i.) ; Booth, " Labor and Life of the People in London," vol. i. 
(chap. on the Jews by Beatrice Potter Webb) ; Century Magazine,1892, 
" The Jews in New York; " Riis, " How the Other Half Lives," chaps. 
x., xi.; Forum, July, 1893, "The Russian Jew ; " Zangwil 1, "Chil- 
dren of the Ghetto," 2 vols. Philipson, " Old European Jewries."