THE FINANCIER 
" Now you must not come near me," she pleaded, de- 
terminedly. " I'll go in the house, and I'll not let you 
come any more. It's terrible! You're silly! You 
mustn't interest yourself in me." 
She did show a good deal of moral determination, and 
he desisted. He went away that night unsatisfied as to 
a caress he wanted to take again, and again, and again. 
Then one night, when they had gone inside because of 
the mosquitoes, and when she had insisted that he could 
not come any more, that his attentions were noticeable 
to others, and that she would be disgraced, he caught 
her, under desperate protest, in his arms. 
" Now, see here!" she exclaimed. " I told you! It's silly! 
You mustn't kiss me ! How dare you! Oh! oh! oh!—" 
She broke away and ran up the near-by stairway to her 
room. Cowperwood followed her swiftly. As she pushed 
the door to he forced it open and recaptured her. He 
lifted her bodily from her feet and held her crosswise, 
lying in his arms. 
" Oh, how could you!" she exclaimed. "I will never 
speak to you any more. I will never let you come here 
any more if you don't put me down this minute. Put 
me down!" 
" I'll put you down, sweet," he said. "I'll take you 
down," at the same time pulling her face to him and kiss- 
ing her. He was very much aroused, excited. 
While she was twisting and protesting, pleading to be 
put on the floor, he carried her down the stairs again 
into the living-room, and seated himself in the great arm- 
chair, still holding her tight in his arms. 
" Oh !" she sighed, falling limp on his shoulder when 
he refused to let her go. Then, because of the set deter- 
mination of his face, some intense pull in him, she smiled. 
" How would I ever explain if I did marry you?" she asked, 
weakly. "Your father! Your mother!" 
" You don't need to explain. I'll do that. And you 
needn't worry about my family. They won't care." 
zoo