THE FINANCIER 
a verdict. The matter of time, as all lawyers know, 
plays a part in this. Juries, speaking of the members 
collectively and frequently individually, object to the 
amount of time it sometimes takes to decide a case. 
They do not enjoy sitting and deliberating over a problem 
unless it is tremendously fascinating. The ramifications 
of the mystery or the syllogism become a weariness 
and a bore. The jury-room itself becomes a dull agony. 
They become sick of every detail. On the other hand, 
no jury contemplates a disagreement with any degree 
of satisfaction. There is something so inherently con- 
structive in the human mind that to leave a problem 
unsolved is plain misery. It haunts the average in- 
dividual like any other important task left unfinished. 
Men in a jury-room, like those scientifically demon- 
strated atoms of a crystal which scientists and philoso- 
phers love to speculate upon, love finally to arrange them- 
selves into an orderly and artistic whole, to present a 
compact, intellectual front, to be whatever they have 
set out to be, properly and right—a compact, sensible 
jury. One sees this same instinct magnificently dis- 
played in every other phase of nature—in the drifting of 
sea-wood to the Sargasso Sea, in the geometric inter- 
relation of air-bubbles on the surface of still water, in 
the marvelous unreasoned architecture of so many insects 
and atomic forms which make up the substance and the 
texture of this world. It would seem as though the 
physical substance of life—this apparition of form which 
the eye detects and calls real—were shot through with 
some vast subtlety that loves order, that is order. The 
atoms of our so-called being, in spite of our so-called 
reason—the dreams of a mood—know where to go and 
what to do. They represent an order, a wisdom, a will- 
ing that is not of us. They build orderly in spite of us. 
So the subconscious spirit of a jury. At the same time, 
one does not forget the strange hypnotic effect of one 
personality on another, the varying effects of varying 
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